no-churn blackberry crisp ice cream

 

Let’s spread the word- you do not need an ice cream maker to make ice cream. We can debate which is better (churned or not), but at the end of the day a well-made batch of ice cream is what matters. Often no-churn ice cream uses sweetened condensed milk as a part of it’s base, but I couldn’t stomach many of the sickly sweet recipes and opted here for a rich, eggy, and only slightly sweet version. I love this recipe because you get to indulge in both blackberry crisp and homemade ice cream while only needing to make one dessert instead of two. I plan on taking FULL advantage of our peak berry season and also satisfying my pregnant cravings for ice cream! 

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NO-CHURN BLACKBERRY CRISP ICE CREAM
ice cream base adapted from Serious Eats

makes one loaf pan or one 8×8 pan

blackberry sauce:
10 ounces blackberries
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
3 tablespoons granulated sugar

ice cream:
3/4 cup (6 ounces) heavy cream
3 large, fresh eggs
1/2 cup (100g) granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

oatmeal crisp:
3/4 cup rolled oats
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2.5 tablespoons butter, softened to room temperature
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Supplies needed: a candy thermometer, preferably one that clips to the side of your bowl, one non-reactive* loaf or 8×8 pan (glass, ceramic, or stainless steel), and a stand or hand mixer.

Put the non-reactive dish in your refrigerator to cool.

Stir together the berries, lemon juice, and sugar in a medium saucepan. Bring to a simmer for 8-10 minutes, stirring occasionally and mashing up the berries to help break them apart. The point of this step is to create a “rustic” berry sauce and concentrate the berry juices. Pour the juice into a bowl and put in the refrigerator.

Mix together the oatmeal crisp ingredients until well combined. Spread onto a medium sized plate, breaking up any large pieces, and place in the refrigerator.

Using a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, whip the heavy cream until stiff peaks form. Spoon into in your cooled non-reactive dish, cover, and put in the refrigerator.

Wash the bowl and whisk of your stand mixer for the next steps. Fill a medium pot with a couple inches of water, and fit some foil around the entire rim of the pot (you are creating a makeshift double boiler, but you don’t want the bowl sitting directly on the boiling pot). Bring the pot of water to a simmer.

Whisk together the eggs, sugar, and salt in the stand mixer bowl. Put your candy thermometer in the egg batter. Set the bowl on the foil rim and whisk constantly, until the egg batter reaches 160 degrees F. This should take approximately 5 minutes. If your water is at a boil, you risk overheating/scrambling the eggs, and if your water isn’t quite at a simmer, this will take significantly longer than 5 minutes.

When the temperature of your egg batter is at 160 degrees F, remove from heat. Put the bowl into your stand mixer (fitted with a whisk attachment), add the vanilla, and beat on high for 5-8 minutes, until at least quadrupled in size. The mixture will turn a creamy color and should become the consistency of a slightly melted soft serve.

Gently stir the oatmeal crisp pieces and whipped cream into the ice cream base until just barely until incorporated. Spoon into the refrigerated dish, smoothing the top of the batter. Retrieve the blackberry compote from the refrigerator and drizzle evenly over the ice cream. Cover the ice cream and freeze for approximately 6 hours before serving.

Why a non-reactive dish? Read about it HERE

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